Future-Proofing Instructional Design and Game Development: Q&A


For example, a handful of instructional design systems that could be used to benefit a game development firm that needs assistance with learning soft skills. Here we have a human-centered concern wi5in the company, incorporating game-like elements to alleviate internal concerns:Provide recommended readings and literature. Also suggest a learning curriculum.

  1. Role-playing exercises: These can be used to simulate real-life scenarios that employees may encounter in their jobs, allowing them to practice and improve their soft skills in a safe, controlled environment.
  2. Virtual reality simulations: VR technology can be used to create immersive, interactive experiences that simulate real-life situations, providing employees with a highly engaging and effective way to learn and practice soft skills.
  3. Online course: An online course that covers the essential soft skills, such as communication, teamwork, and problem-solving, can be accessed by employees at any time, allowing them to learn and practice at their own pace.
  4. Books: “Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High” by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, and Al Switzler. “The Charisma Myth: How Anyone Can Master the Art and Science of Personal Magnetism” by Olivia Fox Cabane.
  5. Learning Curriculum: A learning curriculum that covers the following topics; effective communication, teamwork, problem-solving, time management, leadership, and conflict resolution.
  6. Mentoring program: A mentoring program that pairs experienced employees with newer ones can provide valuable guidance and support as the newer employees learn and practice the soft skills they need to succeed in their roles.

Let’s consider the application of interactive role playing.

Role-playing exercises can be scheduled and implemented in a variety of ways, depending on the specific needs and goals of the game development firm. Here are a few examples of how role-playing exercises might be scheduled and implemented:

  1. Regular training sessions: Role-playing exercises can be scheduled as regular training sessions, where employees come together to practice and improve their soft skills. These sessions can be held weekly or monthly, and can be led by a trainer or facilitator.
  2. Team-building retreats: Role-playing exercises can be incorporated into team-building retreats, where employees spend a day or a weekend practicing and improving their soft skills in a fun, engaging environment.
  3. On-the-job training: Role-playing exercises can be incorporated into on-the-job training, where employees practice and improve their soft skills while they work. This can be done by setting aside time each day or week for role-playing exercises or by incorporating them into regular meetings and team discussions.
  4. Self-paced learning: Role-playing exercises can be made available to employees as self-paced learning resources. These resources can be accessed by employees at any time, allowing them to practice and improve their soft skills at their own pace.
  5. Scenario-based: Role-playing exercises can be designed to reflect specific scenarios that employees may encounter in their work, such as giving feedback, negotiating with clients, or resolving conflicts.
  6. Evaluation: Role-playing exercises can be used to evaluate employees’ soft skills, allowing managers and trainers to identify areas for improvement and provide targeted support and coaching.

It is important to note that the role-playing exercises should be designed with clear learning objectives and should be debriefed for the participants to gain insights and to reflect on the scenarios. Also, the scenario should be relevant to the work and should include a diverse group of participants.

Are we all just LARPing here? I thought this was HR…

what are some common issues that instructional designers are required for? Provide examples.

Instructional designers are often called upon to address a wide range of issues that can arise in the design and development of instructional materials. Some common issues that instructional designers are required to address include:

  1. Complex content: Instructional designers may be called upon to take complex content and make it more accessible and understandable for learners. For example, instructional designers may be required to create instructional materials for a technical training program for software engineers.
  2. Limited resources: Instructional designers may be required to create instructional materials with limited resources, such as budget and time. For example, instructional designers may be required to create an e-learning course with a limited budget and a short timeline.
  3. Learner engagement: Instructional designers may be required to create instructional materials that engage learners and keep them interested in the content. For example, instructional designers may be required to create interactive and multimedia-rich e-learning courses.
  4. Accessibility: Instructional designers may be required to make instructional materials accessible to learners with different abilities and disabilities. For example, instructional designers may be required to create instructional materials that are compatible with screen readers and other assistive technologies.
  5. Measuring effectiveness: Instructional designers may be required to create instructional materials that can be used to measure the effectiveness of the instruction. For example, instructional designers may be required to create pre- and post-tests or assessments that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of an e-learning course.
  6. Adaptability: Instructional designers may be required to create instructional materials that can be adapted for different cultures and languages. For example, instructional designers may be required to create a training program that can be adapted for different countries and languages.
  7. Sustainability: Instructional designers may be required to create instructional materials that can be used and maintained over time. For example, instructional designers may be required to create a training program that can be updated and used for multiple years.

How does story-based design work in instructional design systems. Give an example in a scenario where the instruction is meant to teach how to play Pokémon the card game

Story-based design is a method of instructional design in which a story or narrative is used to frame the instruction and make it more engaging and memorable for learners. In this method, the instructional content is presented in the context of a story, rather than as a series of disconnected facts or concepts.

Here’s an example of how story-based design might be used to teach how to play the Pokémon card game:

  1. The story: A group of friends, including the learner, discover a mysterious package on their doorstep. Inside, they find a deck of Pokémon cards and a note inviting them to learn how to play the game.
  2. The instruction: The instruction is presented in the context of the story, with the friends learning how to play the game together. The instruction covers the basic rules of the game, the different types of cards and their abilities, and strategies for winning.
  3. The characters: The characters in the story, the friends, are used to model different strategies and ways of playing the game. For example, one friend might focus on building a strong defense, while another focuses on aggressive attacks.
  4. The scenarios: The story includes different scenarios, such as battles against different trainers and gym leaders, that are used to demonstrate different strategies and techniques for playing the game.
  5. The Evaluation: The evaluation can be done by having the learners play the game in a controlled scenario and evaluate their understanding and performance of the game.

In this example, the story-based design helps to make the instruction more engaging and memorable for learners by providing a context and a sense of purpose for the instruction. The characters and scenarios in the story also serve as models and examples that learners can relate to and emulate, making the instruction more meaningful and relevant.

Game designer, instructional designer: same-same? Kinda… no? A little.

A game designer could use instructional design skills to create effective and engaging tutorials, in-game instructions, and other forms of player guidance within a game. This could include designing clear and concise text and visual instructions, creating interactive and immersive tutorials, and incorporating feedback mechanisms to ensure players are understanding the information being presented. Additionally, instructional design skills can be used to create a game that is easy to learn and navigate, making it more accessible to players of all skill levels.

How is instructional designer and game development a good pair for professionals to pursue

Instructional design and game development are a good pair for professionals to pursue because they both involve creating engaging and effective learning experiences. Instructional designers focus on creating instructional materials that are easy to understand and interact with, while game developers focus on creating engaging and immersive games. By combining these skills, a professional can create games that not only entertain players, but also effectively teach them new skills and knowledge.

Additionally, both instructional design and game development involve the use of interactive and multimedia elements, such as visuals, audio, and animations, which can make the learning experience more engaging and effective. Both fields also require a deep understanding of human behavior and motivation, which can be applied to create game-based learning experiences that are tailored to the needs and preferences of the target audience.

Furthermore, games have become a crucial part of many industries such as education, healthcare, and corporate training, making the combination of instructional design and game development skills highly sought after by employers.Regenerate response

It all comes down to storytelling and user-centered design


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: